South Korea is Killin’ it in Science, Here’s Why…

New Paper on Atomic-scale Sensing – Nature.com
April 10, 2017
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South Korea is Killin’ it in Science, Here’s Why…

First of all, let’s talk about basic science.

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According to Webster’s, basic science is scientific research aimed to improve understanding or prediction of natural or other phenomena.

Basically, it’s really important for scientists to discover new things.

Like velcro…

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Velcro was created in 1948 after a scientist walked his dog in the woods and was curious about how burrs stuck to clothing so well.

the Internet…

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The internet was created as a platform for scientists to share data & communicate with each other.

and Mars too.

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NASA’s Mars Exploration program is called “Seek Signs of Life.” They are literally looking for aliens.

South Korea thinks this stuff is pretty important, so in 2011 they founded the Institute for Basic Science.

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They teamed up with some of the world’s best scientists and Korea’s top universities; and have committed nearly $8 billion in the pursuit of new discoveries in science

 

They even created 28 state-of-the-art research facilities to make new discoveries across all fields of science.

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At 900 scientists & growing they published more than 700 research papers and results last year.

They are actually changing the world, one discovery at a time.

In Healthcare

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The IBS Center for Vascular Research is discovering all kinds of ways to improve your heart health.

In Climate Change

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The IBS Center for Climate Physics is discovering new ways to make the planet healthier.

In Technology

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At the IBS Center for Quantum Nanoscience we are discovering how we can create things using single atoms.

At QNS, we are working every day to push the limits of knowledge one atom at a time.

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A special microscope allows us to study single atoms and the effects they have on each other in various ways. We can move them, we can change their magnetic fields, and eventually we can use them to build new materials.

Our new facility which will be completed next year, will enable us to to take this epic research even further.

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Our discoveries at Ewha Womans University in Seoul will literally change the way we create and use smart technology, data storage, digital interfaces and so much more!

Thanks South Korea for killin’ it in basic science!

Pushing the Limits of Knowledge

www.qns.science